Gostaria de reagir a esta mensagem? Crie uma conta em poucos cliques ou inicie sessão para continuar.

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Ivanov_br em Seg Jul 12, 2010 7:50 pm

Colegas, encontrei o texto abaixo no site http://doublebassworkshop.com e gostaria de dividi-lo com vocês.

Quando se fala em manutenção de instrumentos musicais, muito se palpita, outros dão dicas valiosas, outros falam muita bobagem.

Acho que poderiamos pegar este texto e dizer o que concordamos e discordamos nele, qual a nossa experiência e o que já ouvimos.

Double Bass Care Guidelines
Written by Henry Boehm

First though, a few words about the sticky subject of glue. The traditional glue that is used to glue basses (and all other violin family instruments) together is called granular hide glue. It is derived from the hides, hoofs and sinews of livestock, usually cow or sheep. It is a glue of antiquity and by today's standards is still amazing in strength. It is what we still use to glue and repair just about everything in the bass. The user buys it in its dry form; dry honey colored granules. It is reconstituted with water and heated to about 140° F. In its cool state it has the same consistency as stiff Jello gelatin because it basically is Jello! Jello and other gelatins are made out of pretty much the same thing (yum!) but are a little more refined and are food grade. In fact you can use plain Knox gelatine mix as a substitute for hide glue in a pinch. So now we know that this stuff is basically a meat product and not surprisingly it has about the same shelf life as meat (the dry granular form lasts indefinitely just as long as it's kept dry). When you go to the hardware store to repair an open seam on your bass and you see that bottle of liquid hide glue, you say, "aha, there's what I need." But don't be fooled. Although that is a hide glue, it is laced with preservatives and stabilizers to keep it from rotting. We have nothing against the folks who make Franklin Liquid Hide Glue or their fine product but it is decidedly NOT what you should use on your bass! The additives change its strength characteristics and make it incompatible with granular hide glue thereby contaminating the glue joint.

There are other glues that have their place in the construction and repairing of the bass, including aliphatic resin glue, the contentious cyanoacrylate glue and a few other modern wonders but the home user need not concern themselves with those. No matter what you're trying to glue, granular hide is the only glue to use with no fear of screwing something up. This is thanks in part to the fact that it's water soluble and is therefore easily removed.

Okay, now back to care guidelines:

Open seams
Generally a seam will open due to changes in humidity, temperature, weak or incorrect glue, or physical impact. You should check seams periodically, especially during seasonal weather changes. An open seam may not always be obvious. You shouldn't let an open seam sit around too long. Get it fixed sooner than later. VERY IMPORTANT: If you take it upon yourself to repair it, NEVER use anything but granular hide glue. In case you missed it, read about glues at the top of this page.

Cracks on top, back and ribs
These should be repaired as soon as possible by a luthier. The longer they're left unrepaired, the more difficult it may be to realign the crack.

Fallen sound post
Loosen strings right away! (even if you're in the middle of a gig!) Failure to due so may result in severe damage to the instrument. Have the soundpost set by your luthier.

Loose neck
If you bang the neck handling the instrument, you may have loosened it. Once the neck is loose, it's more vulnerable to loosening further, even to the point where it may break free. To check for a loose neck, loosen strings and try moving the neck side to side and back and forth. If the neck is loose, you will notice movement where the neck attaches to the body. Even more critical is the joint between the back of the neck heel and the button. If the button is partially or fully separated from the neck heel or appears to be damaged in any other way, it must be repaired as soon as possible.

Changing strings
Here's the easy and correct method. Remove the D, A and E strings, leaving the G at full tension. This should prevent the soundpost from falling. Next, string up the new E string to full tension. Now remove the old G string and string up the new G. Next string on the A and lastly, the D. Do not allow the string to bunch up between the tuning peg and peg box as this will damage the string and cause binding of the tuning gear. Always check the nut and bridge to see that the string isn't jammed in the groove. If it is, get your nut/bridge adjusted to prevent damage to your new strings. Mark the grooves of the bridge and nut with a soft (No. 1 or 2) lead pencil. This will help the strings slide in the grooves without getting damaged. After string installation is complete, check that the bridge is still straight and adjust as necessary.

The bridge
Periodically, check to see that the bridge is perpendicular to the top of the instrument. If it has moved, straighten by pushing it in the appropriate direction (it's normal for the bridge to move on its own). If it's too difficult to move under full string tension, loosen strings a little. Failure to correct a skewed bridge may result in warping of the bridge.
If the bridge gets knocked out of its proper position from handling, loosen strings enough to move bridge. Draw an imaginary line between the notches on the F holes and center the bridge feet on this line. Center strings on fingerboard for side to side alignment. If you don't feel comfortable doing this on your own, bring it to a luthier. They should be able to correct it in a few minutes.

Bridge Adjusters
You should raise and lower bridge height adjusters the same amount on each side. Either count turns or make sure that the gap between the adjuster wheel and bridge leg is equal on each side. If one side gets jacked up higher than the other, it will cause misalignment of the strings on the fingerboard and can damage the threads in the bridge and/or bend the adjuster shaft. If it's impossible to turn the adjusters by hand, don't use pliers. Loosen the strings until you can turn the adjusters by hand. I can usually remedy tight adjusters successfully if you drop your bass by. If the feet move while turning the adjusters, simply hold foot in place while making the adjustment.

Buzzing sounds from your instrument
Buzzing may be caused by a variety of problems. Open seams, incorrectly cut nut or bridge, cheap endpin, damaged strings and cracks are typical culprits. More severe problems could include loose bass bar, loose cleats or other internal parts that have become loose. This may require removal of the top. Consult your luthier.

Scratches

Minor nicks and dings are unavoidable when toting a bass around. Touch up is usually successful in correcting small blemishes. Never use any kind of paint, markers or furniture varnish to touch up your instrument. Touch-up is better left to a luthier

Cleaning of instrument
Consult your luthier for best method of cleaning your instrument. In the mean time, a soft cotton cloth or towel will do. Wipe down the top around the bridge and the strings after every session with the bow. Rosin particles that are left on the top will begin to melt onto the varnish and will require more drastic measures to remove. Do not clean your instrument using the following methods:
-steel wool
-brillo pad
-solvents such as acetone, lacquer thinner, xylene, etc. Some of these agent may work to remove stubborn rosin buildup or other problems such as tar, but they should only be used by a luthier who is experienced working with these substances.
-polishes that contain wax
-polishes that contain silicon

Strings and Fingerboard
Use denatured or isopropyl alcohol to clean strings and fingerboard. Apply alcohol to rag first. NEVER get alcohol on any varnished part of the instrument. Alcohol will damage spirit violin varnish, which is one of the most widely used types of varnish for basses. I don't recommend using an abrasive such as a Brillo pad or steel wool to clean strings. Alcohol will remove all rosin, dirt and finger oil without abrading the string. I also don't recommend applying oil, grease, talcum powder, etc. to strings. These substances will only shorten the life of the string and make a mess. If any windings on strings become damaged, replace the string. Loose windings effect the trueness of the string and can cause buzzing. Always buy the highest quality strings. Cheap strings sound bad and don't last as long as a good set.

Boiling strings (steel strings only-don't try it with gut or composite strings)

String life can be extended by boiling the strings in distilled water. Remove strings from instrument (place a heavy weight on the top to prevent sound post from falling) coil up strings and boil for 10 minutes. Take care not to get the ends of the strings in the water as they may fray. Air dry strings thoroughly, wipe off with a alcohol damp cloth and re-install.
Ivanov_br
Ivanov_br
Moderador

Mensagens : 6130
Localização : Rio Grande do Sul

http://www.myspace.com/bustamanteivan

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Ivanov_br em Dom Jul 18, 2010 12:34 pm

Fallen sound post - Queda da Alma.

Alguem já passou por este problema?
Ivanov_br
Ivanov_br
Moderador

Mensagens : 6130
Localização : Rio Grande do Sul

http://www.myspace.com/bustamanteivan

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Fernando Zadá em Dom Jul 18, 2010 3:33 pm

bacana o texto.
Depois vou comentar com calma apesar de ser bem inexperiente em alguns quesitos!!
Quanto ao que perguntou nunca presenciei mas ja ouvi falar!
Fernando Zadá
Fernando Zadá
Moderador

Mensagens : 11519

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Ruy Rascassi em Sex Out 22, 2010 1:48 pm

Estou Passando por um Problema e Queria uma opnião / PONTO DE VISTA de vcs!

apos UMA Apresentação com Meu trio de free ... Meu dedo literalmente estourou! oq era Bolha se tornou ... um buraco e desse buraco Saiu Sangue e tudo q tinha direito ...............
ja Aconteceu com alguem? Recomendações?

vi um vídeo do Nico Falando q nao tinha bolhas nem Calos .... nao sei .. Mas Acho dificil ...!


abs
Ruy Rascassi
Ruy Rascassi
Membro

Mensagens : 99
Localização : sao caetano do sul - sp

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Claudio em Sex Out 22, 2010 3:26 pm

Ruy Rascassi escreveu:
vi um vídeo do Nico Falando q nao tinha bolhas nem Calos .... nao sei .. Mas Acho dificil ...!

Eu toco Acústico há mais de 10 anos e também não tenho e nunca tive bolhas e nem calos. Não sei se derepente quem toca utilizando arco possa vir a ter bolhas.
Claudio
Claudio
Membro

Mensagens : 15196
Localização : Rio de Janeiro - RJ

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Zarra em Sab Out 23, 2010 3:14 pm

Acho que a questão de bolhas e calos é relativo ao tipo de pele de cada um... eu crio calo com facilidade nas mãos, da mesma forma que facilmente os perco qdo paro de tocar por 3 ou 4 dias. A questão do Nico não ter calos está mais relacionado à técnica dele, usando cordas leves e próximas ao espelho, e tocando bem leve mesmo pra obter mais rapidez.

Eu tinha muita bolha qdo tentava fazer meu baixo soar mais alto do que ele realmente soava tocando pizzicato. Depois que instalei o captador, meus problemas com bolhas na mão direita se acabaram...rsrsrs...
Zarra
Zarra
Membro

Mensagens : 109
Localização : São Paulo

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por luizribeiro em Sab Out 23, 2010 5:33 pm

Sinceramente eu não sei como calos podem vir a ser prejudicial. Só acontece de surgir uma bolha quando você toca uma técnica que sua mão não está acostumada.
Acho que a vida de um músico profissional é muito parecida com a de um atleta, não vejo como não "prejudicar" o corpo de alguma maneira, por mais boba que sejam os calos. Digo prejudicar pois como os calos não estão ali por conta de excesso de carinho, não tem como negar que você castigou a região. Mas novamente volto a dizer, são só calos. Vivemos a vida toda com calos nos pés, se você pratica atividades físicas na academia vai ter calo nas mãos. Bailarinos tem o pé terrível.
Acho que é quase inevitável ter calos.
luizribeiro
luizribeiro
Membro

Mensagens : 611
Localização : Nova Iorque

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Ruy Rascassi em Dom Out 24, 2010 1:22 pm

Relamente acho q calos nao saoprejudiciasi tbm.......e concordo q um captador iria resolver todos os meus problemas qnt a isso....é complicado tentar fazer o baixo falar mais do que pode...a consequencia sera unica...calos e bolhas !
Obrigado a todos pelas respostas me deu um alivio ao saber q nao é tao anormal o q acontece comigo.

abraços a toodos.
Ruy Rascassi
Ruy Rascassi
Membro

Mensagens : 99
Localização : sao caetano do sul - sp

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Gustavofilippe em Seg Dez 06, 2010 10:41 am

Mil perdões, mas tenho que discordar de todos, calos não nada normais, talvez uns calo assim médio ou até grande sejam assim da profissão msm, mas sair sangue ou doer muito muito não é normal, quer dizer que vc está usando algum tipo de corda que lhe obriga a aperta la demais, ou vc tem cordas boas mas mesmo assim aperta de mais elas, perceba uma coisa na sua mão enquanto vc toca, por acaso seu dedão está se esforçando, digamos, está contraido fazendo força em direção as cordas, pois se estiver quer dizer que sua técnica é errada. Nós contrabaixistas precisamos usar a força do braço para apertar as cordas, sem usar de forçar de forma alguma o dedão.
Gustavofilippe
Gustavofilippe
Membro

Mensagens : 13
Localização : São Paulo

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Gustavofilippe em Seg Dez 06, 2010 10:49 am

e se o negócio for no braço direito, a mesma coisa, tanto com arco e pizzicato é necessário se usar o peso do braço para tocar, no pizzicato já é bem difícil ter uma mão sem calos, por isso, eu toco pizzicato de uma forma diferente, nas cordas agudas e digamos belisco as cordas pra cima, já que elas não machucam, mas nas graves e digamos belisco elas pro lado direito, com a mão apoiada no espelho, e sempre nos dois casos usando dois dedos. Já no arco eu deixo o peso do meu braço e do arco cair na corda, peso este que faz a corda vibrar
Gustavofilippe
Gustavofilippe
Membro

Mensagens : 13
Localização : São Paulo

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por luizribeiro em Ter Dez 07, 2010 2:44 am

lembrando que o beslicar a corda é uma técnica de pizzicato para música erudita.
luizribeiro
luizribeiro
Membro

Mensagens : 611
Localização : Nova Iorque

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir? Empty Re: Double Bass Care Guidelines: Vamos discutir?

Mensagem por Conteúdo patrocinado


Conteúdo patrocinado


Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Voltar ao Topo


 
Permissão deste fórum:
Você não pode responder aos tópicos neste fórum